Pediatric Nurses' Perceptions of Pediatric Hospitalist and Nonhospitalist Faculty in the Care of Hospitalized Children

1Penn State M. S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA

Meeting: Hospital Medicine 2007, May 23-25, Dallas, Texas

Abstract number: 25

Background:

Effective collaboration between physicians and nurses is necessary to ensure the optimal care of hospitalized patients. The increasing number of hospitalists across the United States provides the opportunity to affect this working relationship. However, there is limited data regarding nursing perceptions of hospitalists and how they compare to nonhospitalists in the care of hospitalized children.

Methods:

A 10‐item survey was sent to all pediatric nurses who worked on the general pediatrics floor at Penn State Children's Hospital (PSCH) in the spring of 2002. The main outcome measures were to compare nursing perceptions of pediatric hospitalists versus nonhospitalists in the care of patients admitted to the general pediatrics service using a 5‐point Likert scale (1, “much better” or “strongly agree”; 2, “marginally better” or “agree”; 3, “no different” or “neutral”; 4, “marginally worse” or “disagree”; 5, “much worse” or “strongly disagree”) for the following characteristics: quality of medical care provided to hospitalized children, length of time spent with hospitalized children and their families, physician availability for nursing staff concerns, and efficiency of the hospital discharge process. The pediatric nurses were also asked whether the addition of pediatric hospitalists to PSCH has had a positive effect on the care of hospitalized children.

Results:

The survey was completed by 31 of 66 nurses (47% response rate). Compared to nonhospitalists, the evaluations given hospitalists were significantly better for all 4 comparison items: quality of care medical care provided to hospitalized children (1 [much better], P < .0001), length of time spent with hospitalized children and their families (2 [agree], P < .0001), physician availability for nursing staff concerns (2 [agree], P < .0001), and efficiency of the hospital discharge process (2.0 [agree], P < .0001). The pediatric nurses also believed the addition of hospitalists to PSCH has had a positive effect on the care of hospitalized children (1.5 [strongly agree‐agree], P < .0001). Additionally, not a single response gave hospitalists a score > 3.0, which would have favored nonhospitalists over hospitalists.

Conclusions:

Pediatric nurses rated hospitalists significantly higher than nonhospitalists regarding their availability to nursing staff concerns. They also perceived that hospitalists spent more time with patients and their families while being more efficient than nonhospitalists in discharging patients from the hospital. Further studies are needed to see if these findings are reproducible in other hospitals across the United States and to ascertain how physicians and nurses can work together to improve communication skills in the inpatient setting.

Author Disclosure:

J. Geskey, GlaxoSmithKline, speakers bureau; P. A. Light, None; D. Kees‐Folts, None; M. A. Grady, None.

To cite this abstract:

Geskey J, Light P, Kees‐Folts D, Grady M. Pediatric Nurses' Perceptions of Pediatric Hospitalist and Nonhospitalist Faculty in the Care of Hospitalized Children. Abstract published at Hospital Medicine 2007, May 23-25, Dallas, Texas Abstract 25. Journal of Hospital Medicine. 2007; 2 (suppl 2). https://www.shmabstracts.com/abstract/pediatric-nurses-perceptions-of-pediatric-hospitalist-and-nonhospitalist-faculty-in-the-care-of-hospitalized-children/. Accessed November 12, 2019.

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