Patient and Familycentered Rounds on a Geriatric Inpatient Service: Resident and Staff Perspectives of Bedside Rounds

Meeting: Hospital Medicine 2012, April 1-4, San Diego, Calif.

Abstract number: 97548

Background:

While well studied in the pediatric setting, little is known about the application of patient– and family–centered rounds (PFCR) to the adult population, but the potential for care improvement is great. PFCR is a model for empowering patients and families and improving communication and care in an academic, inpatient setting. In contrast to traditional rounding, PFCR occurs at the bedside and actively includes patients and families as well as other members of the healthcare team. Goals include avoidance of medical jargon, clear explanations of medical test results, and genuine collaboration between health professionals, patients, and families to determine best care.

Methods:

In summer 2011, residents N = 13 and staff N = 10 were surveyed immediately following a beside PFCR experience N = 86 total encounters. For comparison, residents N = 11 and staff N=14 on another service that does not use PFCR completed the same survey for each unique encounter with a patient and family (N = 71 total encounters)

Results:

Residents (94%) experiencing PFCR found the process beneficial to patients and families, compared to 80% of residents practicing traditional rounds. Residents (92%) experiencing PFCR found the process beneficial to other residents, compared to 80% of residents practicing traditional rounds. Residents (90%) participating in PFCR said the process improved relationships with patients and families. Residents (63%) in PFCR agreed that PFCR improved resident education, compared to traditional rounds. 84% of residents in PFCR gained a “better understanding about patients compared to traditional rounds.” This group (96%) agreed that they were working as a part of a team, while 70% of residents in traditional rounds felt they were a part of a team. Residents (100%) in the PFCR group agreed or strongly agreed with the idea that PFCR allows for better understanding of the care plan and “enhances ability to communicate with patients”. Teaching volume, both didactic and nondidactic was rated highly by both groups. Staff (100%) in the PFCR group agreed/strongly agreed that “my questions were answered about the patient,””I am working as a part of a team,””I understand the patients care plan for the rest of the day better than had I not participated in PFCR,””PFCR enhances my ability to address fears and worries of patients,” and “PFCR improves communication between the members of the care team.”

Conclusions:

The positive responses of those participating in PFCR indicate that PFCR can lead to positive care experiences for resident and staff providers of geriatric patients and families. Compared to traditional rounds, PFCR is at least as beneficial for both residents and staff in enhancing communication, education, and teamwork. More research is needed with a larger sample to investigate how PFCR outcomes and satisfaction compare to traditional care, but the potential for care improvement, enhanced education, and improved staff satisfaction and involvement in inpatient care is great.

To cite this abstract:

Schlaudecker J, Meganathan K. Patient and Familycentered Rounds on a Geriatric Inpatient Service: Resident and Staff Perspectives of Bedside Rounds. Abstract published at Hospital Medicine 2012, April 1-4, San Diego, Calif. Abstract 97548. Journal of Hospital Medicine. 2012; 7 (suppl 2). https://www.shmabstracts.com/abstract/patient-and-familycentered-rounds-on-a-geriatric-inpatient-service-resident-and-staff-perspectives-of-bedside-rounds/. Accessed October 20, 2019.

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