Inpatient Obesity Perception and Intervention Project

1Internal Medicine, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL
2Internal Medicine, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL
3Internal Medicine, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL

Meeting: Hospital Medicine 2008, April 3-5, San Diego, Calif.

Abstract number: 82

Background:

Many hospital admissions can be attributed to the comorbid conditions obese patients struggle with. Research shows that hospitalization can serve as a trigger to successfully implement lifestyle modifications. We conducted this study to assess patients' perceptions of their weight and whether obese patients would be receptive to a weight loss intervention in the inpatient setting.

Methods:

A convenience sample of overweight and obese patients admitted to the general medicine service at Northwestern Memorial Hospital was obtained. Subjects were identified based on their calculated BMI on admission and appropriate candidates selected. Eligible patients were those ages 18‐90 with a BMI ranging from 25 to 50. We excluded patients who were non‐English speaking, had mental status deficits, coexisting volume overload, or were pregnant. The study tool used was a 23‐question survey administered in interview format. Questions assessed patients' perceptions of their weight and the relation to their current medical condition, past experiences with weight loss, and willingness for inpatient weight loss intervention.

Results:

Of 67 eligible patients, 64 (95.5%) agreed to be interviewed. Patient BMIs ranged from 25 to 50, with 34 patients (53.1%) having a BMI between 25 and 34. Of the 45 patients with a BMI over 30, 44 (97.8%) did recognize that they were overweight; however, 21 (46.7%) were unaware that they met criteria for obesity. When questioned further, 21 of 45 obese patients (46.7%) did feel that their weight contributed to their current hospitalization. Of both overweight and obese patients, 58 (90.6%) stated that they had tried to lose weight in the past, and 50 (78.1%) had succeeded at one time. When patients were asked whether they would be interested in inpatient initiation of weight loss intervention, 41 (64.1%) said yes. None of the patients interviewed stated that they had received weight loss counseling during their hospitalization.

Conclusions:

Many obese patients felt their hospitalization was related to their weight. Obese patients are motivated to lose weight and interested in initiation of weight loss intervention while hospitalized. Unfortunately, these patients are not receiving weight loss education, counseling, or intervention while in the hospital.

Author Disclosure:

K. Wachsberg, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, employment; K. O'Leary, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, employment; M. Williams, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, employment.

To cite this abstract:

Wachsberg K, O'Leary K, Williams M. Inpatient Obesity Perception and Intervention Project. Abstract published at Hospital Medicine 2008, April 3-5, San Diego, Calif. Abstract 82. Journal of Hospital Medicine. 2008; 3 (suppl 1). https://www.shmabstracts.com/abstract/inpatient-obesity-perception-and-intervention-project/. Accessed May 26, 2019.

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