Hospital Medicine Full Circle: Impact of Incorporating Housestaff Into a Productive Nonteaching Hospitalist Group

Meeting: Hospital Medicine 2012, April 1-4, San Diego, Calif.

Abstract number: 97637

Background:

Hospital medicine’s claim to fame has been shorter length of stay (LOS) and equal, if not better, adherence to quality measures without sacrificing patient satisfaction. Comparative studies highlighting these strong characteristics of hospital medicine have done so by comparing non– teaching hospitalist groups against either community primary care physicians or academic primary care physicians. In 2007 began the transformation of a community hospital into an urban academic medical center with non–teaching faculty hospitalists providing inpatient care. However, the presence of housestaff and students are integral in defining a medical center as ‘academic’. In June 2010, housestaff were incorporated into a faculty hospitalist service necessitating a re–engineering of inpatient workflow practices. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of introducing housestaff into a successful non–teaching hospitalist service of a new academic medical center by comparing LOS, patient satisfaction, and compliance with three core measures [acute myocardial infarction (AMI), congestive heart failure (CHF), and pneumonia] in the year preceding the introduction of housestaff with the year the housestaff were incorporated into the hospitalist teams.

Methods:

In this retrospective single–center study, a list of all patients cared for by a faculty hospitalist group at an academic medical center during the period of June 24, 2009 to June 23, 2011 (n= 3655) was obtained. The list was subdivided into two time frames: pre–housestaff group 2010 (June 24, 2009–June 23, 2010) and post–housestaff group 2011 (June 24, 2010– June 23, 2011). The outcome variables selected for comparison were LOS, Press Gainey Satisfaction survey scores, and compliance with core measures. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software was utilized to comparatively analyze data from inpatient admission LOS during the two years, the overall hospitalist group’s Press Ganey satisfaction scores and compliance with select core measures.

Results:

LOS analysis between group 2010 and group 2011 revealed an LOS of 7.1 and 6.7 respectively, (p–value = 0.148). Comparative analysis of compliance with select core measures between the two groups did not reveal any statistical difference. Press Ganey scores did not demonstrate any significant variation amongst the two groups.

Conclusions:

The incorporation of housestaff into a pre–existing successful non–teaching hospitalist service in a new academic medical center does not adversely affect the overall hospitalist group’s LOS, patient satisfaction scores, or compliance with core measures such as acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure,and pneumonia.

To cite this abstract:

Jaffer A, Li D, Zuleta J, Symes S, Abbas S. Hospital Medicine Full Circle: Impact of Incorporating Housestaff Into a Productive Nonteaching Hospitalist Group. Abstract published at Hospital Medicine 2012, April 1-4, San Diego, Calif. Abstract 97637. Journal of Hospital Medicine. 2012; 7 (suppl 2). https://www.shmabstracts.com/abstract/hospital-medicine-full-circle-impact-of-incorporating-housestaff-into-a-productive-nonteaching-hospitalist-group/. Accessed November 13, 2019.

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