Geriward: An Interprofessional Team‐Based Curriculum on Care of the Hospitalized Older Adult

1University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
2University of California, San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA

Meeting: Hospital Medicine 2011, May 10-13, Dallas, Texas.

Abstract number: 196

Background:

Regardless of specialty or discipline, the majority of health care profession students care for hospitalized older adults during their training and in their future careers. It is therefore crucial that students have educational experience in the area of geriatrics, including team‐based learning experiences that mirror interdisciplinary care models.

Purpose:

We developed a geriatrics curriculum, Geri‐Ward, for third‐year medical students, fourth‐year pharmacy students, and graduate nursing students during their clinical rotations. The objectives were to (1) identify and teach key geriatric competencies pertaining to the hospital setting, (2) engage in team‐based learning to complete a patient‐focused bedside assessment, and (3) have the students present their assessment to their inpatient ward teams, emphasizing the importance of systems‐based practice.

Description:

Students were placed into interdisciplinary teams according to their assigned ward teams during the clinical rotation. Each team obtained consent from a patient, who was interviewed and examined as part of the exercise. GeriWard consisted of 2 parts: (1) a 2‐hour bedside clinical exercise, in which teams assessed a patient on 1 of 3 clinically relevant geriatric AAMC competencies: bladder catheters, restraints, or skin assessment/pressure ulcer staging; and (2) student presentations to their inpatient ward teams emphasizing the system‐based practice they learned from the patient exercise. During the 6‐month pilot, 37 medical students, 20 pharmacy students, and 23 nursing students participated. Compared with presurvey findings, there was a measurable improvement in students’ attitudes toward the interprofessional education postcurriculum, most significantly by the medical students. Students rated knowledge and self‐efficacy on the competencies higher after participating in the curriculum. After the program, 88% of participants were confident in identifying indications for bladder catheters and risk factors for pressure ulcers, compared with only 60% before the curriculum. More than 90% of students agreed that they learned skills they would apply to future patient care. Hospitalist faculty highly rated the presentations including ability to identify the patient problem and implications for improving systems‐based practice.

Conclusions:

GeriWard is a novel curriculum on the care of the hospitalized older adult that combines interprofessional team‐based learning with a patient encounter. Students actively engage in the learning process by presenting their patient cases back to their inpatient teams. These experiences can improve students self‐assessed ability to care for hospitalized older adults and insight into how systems issues can directly affect patient care.

Disclosures:

S. Rennke ‐ University of California, San Francisco, faculty; L. Mackin ‐University of California, San Francisco, faculty; A. Moylan ‐ University of California, San Francisco, faculty; B. Johnston ‐ University of California, San Francisco VA Medical Center, faculty; E. Tam ‐ University of California, San Francisco, faculty; V. Jue ‐ University of California, San Francisco, faculty; C. Lai ‐ University of California, San Francisco, faculty

To cite this abstract:

Rennke S, Mackin L, Moylan A, Johnston B, Wallhagen M, Tam E, Jue V, Lai C. Geriward: An Interprofessional Team‐Based Curriculum on Care of the Hospitalized Older Adult. Abstract published at Hospital Medicine 2011, May 10-13, Dallas, Texas. Abstract 196. Journal of Hospital Medicine. 2011; 6 (suppl 2). https://www.shmabstracts.com/abstract/geriward-an-interprofessional-teambased-curriculum-on-care-of-the-hospitalized-older-adult/. Accessed March 28, 2020.

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