Exploring Trends in Volunteerism Among Hospitalists and Non‐Hospitalists at Academic and Non‐Academic Centers

1UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC

Meeting: Hospital Medicine 2014, March 24-27, Las Vegas, Nev.

Abstract number: 16

Background:

For healthcare providers, volunteerism and service education are important aspects of professional development and public leadership. While several research studies have examined volunteerism among physicians, we know little about such activities among Hospitalists compared to other specialties. We aimed to quantify the frequency and type of volunteerism among Hospitalists and non‐Hospitalists at academic and non‐academic centers.

Methods:

We conducted a cross‐sectional study of healthcare providers at 5 North Carolina hospitals (2 academic and 3 non‐academic) using a 25‐question survey to query volunteer activities within the past 12 months. The survey was distributed in July 2013 and asked respondents to describe their volunteer activities. At the University of North Carolina, we included the Section of Hospital Medicine, the Division of General Internal Medicine, and the Department of Pediatrics. Responses from other hospitals were solely from Hospitalists. Data were analyzed using Predictive Analytics Software (formerly SPSS), version 18.

Results:

One hundred one providers completed the survey; 62% (n=63) reported having volunteered within the last 12 months, 59% (n=60) in a professional capacity. Of the 60 who reported volunteering in a professional capacity in the last 12 months, 30% (n=18) volunteered 20 – 50 hours and 17% (n=10) more than 50 hours.

Of those who volunteered in a professional capacity, 45% (n=27) volunteered by teaching medical students or medical residents, 43% (n=26) worked at volunteer medical clinics, 30% (n=18) participated in regional or national medical conferences, 25% (n=15) engaged in medical advocacy, and 12% (n=7) volunteered on international or domestic medical trips.

When comparing Hospitalists to non‐Hospitalists, there were no statistically significant differences in the number of hours spent volunteering (p=0.112). Providers at academic centers spent significantly more hours volunteering than those at non‐academic centers (p=0.011). Additionally, those who were 34 years or younger spent fewer hours volunteering in a professional capacity than those 35‐44 (p=0.082) or 45 or older (p=0.074). Those with 10 or more years of clinical experience spent significantly more hours volunteering in a professional capacity than those with less clinical experience (p=0.035). Males spent significantly more hours volunteering in a professional capacity than females (p=0.036). Providers with children in the household spent significantly more hours volunteering in a professional capacity than those without children (p=0.034).

Conclusions:

Hospitalists and non‐Hospitalists volunteer similar amounts. The majority of respondents reported volunteering in a professional capacity within 12 months of the survey, most commonly by educating medical students and residents. Volunteerism was significantly influenced by age, gender, clinical experience, presence of children in the household, and working in an academic center. Understanding these trends can enable thoughtful faculty development in promoting leaders in community and professional service.

To cite this abstract:

Gilchrist M, Hobbs R, Liles A. Exploring Trends in Volunteerism Among Hospitalists and Non‐Hospitalists at Academic and Non‐Academic Centers. Abstract published at Hospital Medicine 2014, March 24-27, Las Vegas, Nev. Abstract 16. Journal of Hospital Medicine. 2014; 9 (suppl 2). https://www.shmabstracts.com/abstract/exploring-trends-in-volunteerism-among-hospitalists-and-nonhospitalists-at-academic-and-nonacademic-centers/. Accessed September 16, 2019.

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