Experience Sampling Measurement of Inpatient Pain and Pain Managment

1University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Meeting: Hospital Medicine 2011, May 10-13, Dallas, Texas.

Abstract number: 43

Background:

Timely treatment of pain is a key measure of quality of pain control for hospitalized patients. However, this is usually measured by retrospective patient reports that may be inaccurate. The experience sampling method (ESM) provides real‐time assessments of experience at randomly selected times. ESM may provide more accurate data to understand the relationship between waiting time for pain medication and patient satisfaction, which could help improve the quality of pain control for hospitalized patients.

Methods:

We investigated the relationship of waiting time for pain medication to patient satisfaction with physician and nurse efforts to control pain and overall satisfaction with pain control. Two data sources were collected from each patient: (1) ESM data collected during 5 random times throughout the day concerning current pain, waiting time for pain medications, and satisfaction with pain control; and (2) follow‐up data on satisfaction with pain control from a phone interview 30 days postdischarge. Because repeated responses are nested within each level, ESM data were estimated with a multilevel mixed‐effects model. An ordered logit model was used for the patient level follow‐up data.

Results:

We collected 1906 ESM survey responses from 469 patients. Twenty percent of patients waited more than 30 minutes to receive their pain medication in the ESM data; 28% reported waiting at least 30 minutes for pain medication at some point in their hospitalization. ESM data demonstrated that patients became dissatisfied when they waited 20 minutes or longer for pain medication. Patients were more likely to be dissatisfied with nurses rather than physicians as waiting time increased. Estimation with the follow‐up data indicated that the longest waiting time per hospital stay increased patient dissatisfaction up to 5.25 times for overall pain management (P = 0.001), 3.58 times for pain management by the nurse (P = 0.032), and 4.87 times for pain management by the physician (P = 0.005).

Conclusions:

ESM and retrospective data indicate that patients’ satisfaction with pain control decreases with greater waiting time for pain medication, especially after 20 minutes. ESM measures of satisfaction with pain control are strongly associated with maximum wait times.

Disclosures:

T. Eshedagho ‐ none; D. Meltzer ‐ none; H. Tak ‐ none; A. Schram ‐ none; A. Mayo ‐ none

To cite this abstract:

Eshedagho T, Meltzer D, Tak H, Schram A, Mayo A. Experience Sampling Measurement of Inpatient Pain and Pain Managment. Abstract published at Hospital Medicine 2011, May 10-13, Dallas, Texas. Abstract 43. Journal of Hospital Medicine. 2011; 6 (suppl 2). https://www.shmabstracts.com/abstract/experience-sampling-measurement-of-inpatient-pain-and-pain-managment/. Accessed July 21, 2019.

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