Effects of Contact Precautions on Patient Satisfaction: A Prospective Cohort Study

1University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
2University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
3University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
4University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA
5University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
6University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
7Dana‐Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
8University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

Meeting: Hospital Medicine 2013, May 16-19, National Harbor, Md.

Abstract number: 81

Background:

Contact precautions decrease health care worker–patient contact and may affect patient satisfaction. Contact precautions have been reported to result in fewer health care worker visits and an increase in adverse events. Our objective was to further determine the association between contact precautions and patient satisfaction.

Methods:

We conducted a prospective cohort study of 528 medical and surgical inpatients and evaluated them on admission and hospital days 3, 7, and 14 (until discharged). At each point, patients underwent a standardized interview to identify perceived problems with care. After discharge, the standardized interview and Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey were administered by phone. Responses were recorded, transcribed, and coded by 2 physician reviewers.

Results:

Of the 528 patients included in the primary analysis, 104 (20%) perceived some issue with their care. On multivariable logistic regression, contact precautions were independently associated with a greater number of perceived concerns with care (OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.31–3.21; P < 0.01), specifically including poor coordination of care (P = 0.02) and a lack of respect for patient needs and preferences (P = 0.001). Eighty‐eight patients were included in the secondary analysis of HCAHPS. Patients on and off contact precautions did not have different HCAHPS scores (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 0.64–5.00, P = 0.27).

Conclusions:

Patients on contact precautions were more likely to perceive problems with their care, especially poor coordination of care and a lack of respect for patient preferences.

To cite this abstract:

Mehrotra P, Croft L, Day H, Perencevich E, Pineles L, Harris A, Weingart S, Morgan D. Effects of Contact Precautions on Patient Satisfaction: A Prospective Cohort Study. Abstract published at Hospital Medicine 2013, May 16-19, National Harbor, Md. Abstract 81. Journal of Hospital Medicine. 2013; 8 (suppl 2). https://www.shmabstracts.com/abstract/effects-of-contact-precautions-on-patient-satisfaction-a-prospective-cohort-study/. Accessed November 22, 2019.

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