Do Hospitalists Perform More Inpatient Procedures Than Nonhospitalists

1Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
2Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
3University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE
4American College of Physicians, Philadelphia, PA
5Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

Meeting: Hospital Medicine 2008, April 3-5, San Diego, Calif.

Abstract number: 77

Background:

The number of hospitalist physicians in the United States has grown rapidly over the past decade. Given their constant, on‐site presence, hospitalists are well suited to perform many inpatient procedures. Yet little is known about the range of bedside procedures performed by hospitalists. We conducted this study to (1) characterize the type and frequency of the procedures performed by hospitalists and (2) understand how hospitalists compare to nonhospitalist physicians with respect to these procedures.

Methods:

We analyzed data from a 2004 survey on bedside procedures mailed to nonspecialist members of the American College of Physicians. We defined hospitalists as respondents who spent more than 10 hours per week in clinical activity and more than 40% of their clinical time in hospital‐based activity. The analyses focused on the 8 procedures described by the Society of Hospital Medicine as hospitalist core competencies (electrocardiogram interpretation, chest x‐ray interpretation, central line placement, lumbar puncture, thoracentesis, abdominal paracentesis, endotracheal intubation, and arthrocentesis) and 2 critical care procedures (Swan‐Ganz catheter placement and ventilator management).

Table 1.

Results:

Of 1059 respondents, 175 were classified as hospitalists and 884 as nonhospitalists. Comparisons of the proportions of physicians within each group who perform these procedures are shown below.

Conclusions:

A higher percentage of hospitalists are performing core inpatient and critical care procedures than are nonhospitalist physicians. Yet many hospitalists do not engage in these clinical activities. Further analyses will assess whether practice characteristics or financial incentives influence these associations. Not doing inpatient procedures may delay patient care and affect revenues. Hospitalist groups should examine barriers that influence the performance of these core procedures.

Author Disclosure:

R. Thakkar, none; S. Wright, none; R. Wigton, none; P. Alguire, none; R. Boonyasai, none.

To cite this abstract:

Thakkar R, Wright S, Wigton R, Alguire P, Boonyasai R. Do Hospitalists Perform More Inpatient Procedures Than Nonhospitalists. Abstract published at Hospital Medicine 2008, April 3-5, San Diego, Calif. Abstract 77. Journal of Hospital Medicine. 2008; 3 (suppl 1). https://www.shmabstracts.com/abstract/do-hospitalists-perform-more-inpatient-procedures-than-nonhospitalists/. Accessed November 13, 2019.

« Back to Hospital Medicine 2008, April 3-5, San Diego, Calif.