Cancer Screening in an Urban Medical Center

1Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY
2Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY
3Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY
4Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY
5Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY

Meeting: Hospital Medicine 2009, May 14-17, Chicago, Ill.

Abstract number: 83

Background:

It is well known that there are disparities in health care for minorities in the United States. Multiple studies have shown that differences exist in all aspects of care including prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, in particular, minorities are much less likely to receive the recommended screening tests for various cancers. With the diverse socioeconomic and ethnic mix of our New York City medical center, we conducted a survey of our inpatient hospitaiist population to assess their cancer screening rates. The purpose was to evaluate if hospitalists have an opportunity to improve compliance rates for cancer screening even though this is typically seen as an outpatient physician responsibility.

Methods:

This was a cross‐sectional survey of patients admitted to a major medical center in Manhattan. Patients were enrolled over a 3‐month period. Eligible patients included women aged 18–80 and men aged 50‐80 admitted to the hospitaiist medical service. The survey was anonymous and self‐administered by patients. It included sociodemographic variables as well as questions on screening for colon, breast, and cervical cancer.

Results:

Ninety‐one surveys were completed over a 3‐month period. The mean age of respondents was 57 years (SD 11.9 years), 47% were female, and 80% spoke English as the primary language. Twenty‐six percent were African American, 39% Hispanic, 26% white, and 5% Asian. Compliance rates for cervical and breast cancer screening were 90% and 91%, respectively. Compliance rates for colon cancer screening were much lower — 65%. Compliance for colon cancer screening varied among ethnic groups, with 79% of whites, 67% of African Americans, 61% of Hispanics, and 33% of Asians reporting compliance with colon cancer screening. Compliance rates did not differ significantly by sex, with 74% of women and 61% of men reporting compliance with colon cancer screening. Age was also not significantly associated with compliance.

Conclusions:

Most patients were compliant with breast and cervical cancer screening, with rates at 90%, both above the national average of 80%. However, compliance rates for colon cancer screening were 65%. Although this is above the national average of 50%, it still provides an opportunity for improvement. In summary, this study justifies a need for a referral program to increase colon cancer screening. Hospitalists are in a key position to facilitate these referrals and further educate patients on the need for appropriate preventative screening.

Author Disclosure:

D. Rizk, Beth Israel Medical Center, employment; P. Friedmann, Beth Israel Medical Center, employment; D. Rosen, Beth Israel Medical Center, employment; R. Stalek, Beth Israel Medical Center, employment; N. Moss, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, education.

To cite this abstract:

Rizk D, Friedmann P, Rosen D, Stalek R, Moss N. Cancer Screening in an Urban Medical Center. Abstract published at Hospital Medicine 2009, May 14-17, Chicago, Ill. Abstract 83. Journal of Hospital Medicine. 2009; 4 (suppl 1). https://www.shmabstracts.com/abstract/cancer-screening-in-an-urban-medical-center/. Accessed September 16, 2019.

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