Associated Factors and Impact of Resident Teaching Time in the Era of Limitation of Duty Hours

1University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA

Meeting: Hospital Medicine 2007, May 23-25, Dallas, Texas

Abstract number: 46

Background:

Some residents report spending less time teaching since the implementation of duty‐hour restrictions. This study aimed to assess factors associated with spending less time teaching and to determine the impact of time spent teaching on resident emotional exhaustion and satisfaction with quality of patient care provided.

Methods:

We surveyed 164 internal medicine residents at the University of California, San Francisco. Residents reported the amount of time spent teaching and completing nonphysician administrative tasks before and after the implementation of duty‐hour restrictions. They also reported the frequency of feeling overwhelmed and worn out, their satisfaction with the quality of patient care they provided, and how they perceived the value to their own educational experience of teaching others. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with self‐reported decreased time spent teaching as well as the relationship between decreased teaching time, emotional exhaustion, and satisfaction with quality of patient care.

Results:

One hundred and twenty‐five residents (76%) responded. Nearly one quarter (23%) reported spending less time teaching after implementation of duty‐hour restrictions. In multivariable models, PGY‐2 and PGY‐3 residents (OR = 9.84, CI: 2.26‐42.91; and OR = 14.88, CI: 2.76‐80.22, respectively) and those who reported spending more time on nonphysician administrative tasks (OR = 1.03, CI: 1.00‐1.06) reported spending less time teaching. Residents who spent less time teaching, though, reported less emotional exhaustion (P = .03) and more satisfaction with quality of patient care (P = .06). Those residents also placed a similar value on teaching to their educational experience as that of the residents who spent the same or more time teaching after duty hours were reduced.

Conclusions:

Our results show that spending less time teaching may be beneficial to resident well‐being and patient care. Efforts should be made to optimize the time spent teaching, including limiting the nonphysician administrative tasks that physicians have to do and considering strategies to improve effective and efficient teaching modalities.

Author Disclosure:

L. A. Mazotti, None; A. R. Vidyarthi, None; R. M. Wachter, None; A. D. Auerbach, None; P. P. Katz, None.

To cite this abstract:

Mazotti L, Vidyarthi A, Wachter R, Auerbach A, Katz P. Associated Factors and Impact of Resident Teaching Time in the Era of Limitation of Duty Hours. Abstract published at Hospital Medicine 2007, May 23-25, Dallas, Texas Abstract 46. Journal of Hospital Medicine. 2007; 2 (suppl 2). https://www.shmabstracts.com/abstract/associated-factors-and-impact-of-resident-teaching-time-in-the-era-of-limitation-of-duty-hours/. Accessed September 22, 2019.

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