Advancing Geriatrics Education: An Efficient Faculty Development Program for Academic Hospitalists Increases Geriatric Teaching

1University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
2University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
3University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
4University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
5University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
6University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA

Meeting: Hospital Medicine 2010, April 8-11, Washington, D.C.

Abstract number: 180

Background:

Hospitalists care for an increasing number of older patients. As teachers of medicine, they are uniquely positioned to teach geriatric skills to residents. Faculty development programs focused on geriatrics leaching skills are often expensive and time intensive and may or may not enhance trainees1 learning.

Purpose:

To evaluate the impact of a train‐the‐trainer faculty development model designed to equip hospitalists with knowledge and skills lo teach gerialric lopics to residents in a time‐constrained environment.

Description:

After a formal needs assessment, a 10‐hour geriatric training curriculum was created: the Reynolds Program for Advancing Geriatrics Educalion (PAGE}. Cotaught by geriatricians and hospitalists at the University of California San Francisco's academic, tertiary‐care hospital during preexisting noon conferences over 1 year. PAGE consisted of exportable teaching modules, using “teachable moments” and teaching triggers.” Evaluation of the model examined hospitalist trainees' reactions and self‐efficacy, faculty session leaders' reactions, and internal medicine residents' self‐reported frequency of receiving teaching in geriatrics and use of geriatrics skills. The curriculum was highly rated by hospitalist faculty and session leaders. Fourteen hospitalists on average attended each session, and all attended at least 1 session. Hospitalists improved their teaching skills in geriatrics, indicating that Ihey were “likely” to “highly likely” to use these leaching tools in the future (M = 4.61, SD ‐ 0.53). Faculty confidence to teach residents about geriatrics improved signiHcanUy with a large effect size (pretest M = 3.05, SD ‐ 0.60; posttest M = 3.96, SD ‐0.36, d‐ 1.52; P< 0.001). Session attendance was positively correlated with the increase in geriatrics teaching self‐confidence (r = 0.62, P < 0.05). Faculty session leaders (n =15) overall enjoyed coleaching sessions and believed it fostered a collaborative learning environment between the divisions. Residents reported both significantly more geriatrics leaching by hospitalists P < 0.05) versus nonhospitalists and a borderline significant increase in their practice of geriatric clinical skills (P = 0.05).

Conclusions:

This time‐efficient geriatric train‐the‐trainer faculty development program for hospitalists improved the amount and quality of geriatrics teaching and skill practice among faculty and residents at an academic medical center. Transportable to other hospitalist programs and low cost, the PAGE program is concise, feasible, and a successful way to increase geriatric skill development in the hospital setting.

Author Disclosure:

L Mazotti, none; A, Moylan, none; E, Murphy, none; K, Hauer, none; C, Johnston, none; Harper, none.

To cite this abstract:

Mazotti L, Moylan A, Murphy E, Hauer K, Johnston C, Harper M. Advancing Geriatrics Education: An Efficient Faculty Development Program for Academic Hospitalists Increases Geriatric Teaching. Abstract published at Hospital Medicine 2010, April 8-11, Washington, D.C. Abstract 180. Journal of Hospital Medicine. 2010; 5 (suppl 1). https://www.shmabstracts.com/abstract/advancing-geriatrics-education-an-efficient-faculty-development-program-for-academic-hospitalists-increases-geriatric-teaching/. Accessed July 19, 2019.

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